Sunday, 1 February 2015

Any ideas anyone?

I have a gardening dilemma.
I have a planter with trellis attached that I have had for 2 years. It is a cheap and nasty thing but if I could get something to climb up it then it could look really nice over Summer.
Here is a photo of it:


The problem with it is that it only fits a window box planter in so I can't use it to grow anything that needs lots of space for deep roots, so I am looking for annual climbers that don't need lots of root space. So far over the last two years I have had zero success with it - first year I planted sweet peas and because they grow deep they did absolutely nothing, second year I planted morning glory and black eyed susan and these were both also a complete non starter.

So it is time to ask the people who follow my blog if they have any good ideas, I do want to grow annuals in it and am planning growing from seed.
Here are some ideas I got off the internet:

Spanish Flag
Cup and Saucer Plant
Twining snap dragon
Purple bell vine.
Nasturtiam

I have never grown any off these before so rather than make a mistake for a third year running and end up with nothing has anyone any experience of growing these or any other annuals in fairly shallow planters?

All ideas welcome.


24 comments:

  1. I grow cup and saucer plant but in open ground. Couldn't you knock the bottom of it out.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Just what I was going to say then you could grow your sweet peas or clematis.
    xx

    ReplyDelete
  3. A couple of strawberry plants? If you put a couple of hooks in the trellis, perhaps you could hang a hand spade and fork , or some light (as opposed to heavy) garden decor - but there again a garden candle might also work - there - to fill the space and create an interest point.

    Your problem is the insert tray is not very deep - so regular watering is a must.

    T'would make a wonderful garden feature :)

    ReplyDelete
  4. I would try nasturtium. They flower better in poor soil. Some varieties are short you want one that would climb up.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Thank you all for your suggestions. I am thinking that nasturtiums are coming out as the biggest contender. Unfortunately I can't knock the bottom out of it because it is up on the decking and 2 metres above ground level so there is no soil underneath. I am quite fancying some nice climbing nasturtiums, especailly as the ones I was just looking at say that they grow in poor soil. Sounds perfect.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Have come to read this a bit late, but do also agree with the nasturtiums. Good choice!

      Delete
  6. And Nasturtiums are tasty, great in salad.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Don't think you can go wrong with nasturtium, and edible :)

    ReplyDelete
  8. The only thing about nasturtiums is...mine always succumb to black aphids. They get so gross, I pull out the plants pretty early in the season. Another plant to add to the list for consideration may be Thunbergia, Black Eyed Susan vine--comes in golden yellow, paler yellow shades, and also rosy peach.

    ReplyDelete
  9. I was going to suggest peas but oops guess you've been there done that as they say, ha. Nasturtiums are the next suggestion and as everyone else has suggested it, sounds like they are the winner. :-) Keep us posted!!

    ReplyDelete
  10. nasturtiums!
    Black Eyed Susan Vine, maybe!

    ReplyDelete
  11. My first thought .... Nasturtiums.

    ReplyDelete
  12. My first thought .... Nasturtiums.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Put rocks in the bottom and attach orchids or tsillandsias (sp?) to the trellis.

    ReplyDelete
  14. I must admit I always think of planting in my garden as something for all year round, if you use that whole planter for nasturtiums it will be rather empty for nearly 6 months every year. I would have planted 2 shallow rooted evergreens, for example skimmias and then some annuals in between. That way you will have all year interest, and skimmias look absolutely lovely from October to May, the rest of the year it’s just a green bush, a backdrop for whatever else you there. Skimmias grow very slowly and will be happy there for many years, when they get too big you can take them out and plant them somewhere else in the garden.

    ReplyDelete
  15. What about ivy - it grows anywhere - interspersed with something colourful

    ReplyDelete
  16. Looks like nasturtiums are the way to go, although I would like to try some of the less usual coloured ones, I've seen some nice white ones as well as some gorgeous scarlet ones. I like Helene's idea of putting something else in with them to make them more interesting for the rest of the year. I am unfamiliar with skimmias so I will have a look at them. Thanks all for some great suggestions.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Grow sugar snap peas! That's what I would use it for.

    ReplyDelete
  18. Before you plant anything how about standing a mirror behind the trellis for interest the whole year round? As the nasturtiums grow, they will be reflected and look as though there are twice as many blooms; for the rest of the year the mirror will add light and an illusion of space to your garden.

    ReplyDelete
  19. Not sure about the mirror idea. I had to cover one up in my garden after a goldcrest exhausted itself fighting its own reflection. I took the mirror down after that. Thunbergia is a good long flowering climber and problem free in my experience - I'd put in two or three in a planter that size. If you're going for nasturtiums, N 'Empress of India' is a really good dark red. I don't have a problem with aphids on them - its the cabbage white caterpillars that go for mine. Dave

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Good point, David. The reaction to my own mirror in the garden was when my dog saw his reflection - and did a double take! Lol, lol.

      Delete
  20. cucumbers, string beans, morning glories, blackberry

    ReplyDelete